The interplay between relationships, stress, and sleep

Investigators found that people who have positive relationship experiences in early adulthood experience fewer, less disruptive stressful life events at age 32, which in turn predicts better sleep quality at age 37. Sleep is a shared behavior in many romantic relationships, and it is a strong contender for how relationships “get under the skin” to affect long-term health. The study’s findings add to a growing body of literature showing that one of the important ways in which relationships impact individuals is by reducing the occurrence and severity of life stress.

“Although a large body of evidence shows that relationships are important for health, we are just beginning to understand how the characteristics of people’s close relationships affect health behaviors, such as sleep,” said lead author Chloe Huelsnitz, a PhD candidate at the University of Minnesota. “The findings of our study suggest that one way that relationships affect health behavior is through their effects on individuals’ stress.”

Top Articles

Phytochemicals: beyond vitamins

Phytochemicals are non-nutritive chemicals in plant foods that protect plants from microbial invasions and infections.

Read More

Targeting an RNA-binding protein to fight aging

Researchers have found that the RNA-binding protein PUM2 contributes to the accumulation of defective mitochondria, a key feature of the aging process. Targeting PUM2 in old animals protects against age-related mitochondrial dysfunction.

Read More

People in Canada have good health, are living longer: Global Burden of Disease Study trends

Data from the Global Burden of Disease Study shows that the overall health of Canadians is good and is consistent with other similar countries, and people are living longer with diseases.

Read More

Latest News

Larger drug trials that intervene earlier needed for Alzheimer’s disease

There are currently no drugs that stop or inhibit Alzheimer’s disease. Despite drug trials showing plaque reduction in the brain, the patients’ cognitive function did not improve. Would the results be different if it were possible to design studies that intervene much earlier on in the disease, before cognition is affected? This is what an international study has attempted to facilitate.

Read

Indications why older people are more susceptible to Alzheimer’s disease

The risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease increases with age. Medical researchers have uncovered a possible cause for this connection: Certain molecules involved in the disease, termed tau-proteins, spread more easily in the aging brain.

Read

Combat veterans more likely to experience mental health issues in later life

Military veterans exposed to combat were more likely to exhibit signs of depression and anxiety in later life than veterans who had not seen combat, a new study shows.

Read

“Our bodies are our gardens - our wills are our gardeners.”

William Shakespeare