Migraines linked to higher risk of dementia

Identifying a mid-life risk factor for dementia, such as migraines, will allow for earlier detection of at-risk individuals. It may also help improve researchers’ understanding of the biology of Alzheimer’s disease and dementia.

“We don’t yet have any way to cure Alzheimer’s disease, so prevention is key,” said senior author Suzanne L. Tyas, PhD, of the University of Waterloo, in Canada. “Identifying a link to migraines provides us with a rationale to guide new strategies to prevent Alzheimer’s disease.”

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“Our bodies are our gardens - our wills are our gardeners.”

William Shakespeare